Course Detail (Course Description By Faculty)

Topics in Labor Economics (33918)

This course studies topics in labor economics, surveying both recent theoretical and empirical work in the field. The topics will build on core topics in labor economics and will survey recent work on gender discrimination, racial discrimination, gender and racial gaps in labor market outcomes, applied econometric tools in the economics of education, inequality, organizational economics, and minimum wages.
First-year micro theory, especially game theory and basic theory of consumer/producer demand. The problem sets will involve some statistical programming (in the language of your choice), and we will try to make these assignments both useful and challenging. In our experience, the programming/statistical part is more challenging for students than the math.  PhD students only: strict.
  • PhD - students only
There is no assigned textbook. All assigned readings will be recent papers.

Grades will be determined by the following formula: 

Percent of Final Grade
Referee Reports 25%
Problem Sets 50%
Final Exam 25%

  • Allow Provisional Grades (For joint degree and non-Booth students only)
  • Early Final Grades (For joint degree and non-Booth students only)
Description and/or course criteria last updated: June 30 2023
SCHEDULE
  • Spring 2024
    Section: 33918-50
    W 9:00 AM-12:00 PM
    Harper Center
    3A - Seminar Room
    In-Person Only

Topics in Labor Economics (33918) - Campos, Christopher>> ; Mountjoy, Jack>> ; Notowidigdo, Matthew>>

This course studies topics in labor economics, surveying both recent theoretical and empirical work in the field. The topics will build on core topics in labor economics and will survey recent work on gender discrimination, racial discrimination, gender and racial gaps in labor market outcomes, applied econometric tools in the economics of education, inequality, organizational economics, and minimum wages.
First-year micro theory, especially game theory and basic theory of consumer/producer demand. The problem sets will involve some statistical programming (in the language of your choice), and we will try to make these assignments both useful and challenging. In our experience, the programming/statistical part is more challenging for students than the math.  PhD students only: strict.
  • PhD - students only
There is no assigned textbook. All assigned readings will be recent papers.

Grades will be determined by the following formula: 

Percent of Final Grade
Referee Reports 25%
Problem Sets 50%
Final Exam 25%

  • Allow Provisional Grades (For joint degree and non-Booth students only)
  • Early Final Grades (For joint degree and non-Booth students only)
Description and/or course criteria last updated: June 30 2023
SCHEDULE
  • Spring 2024
    Section: 33918-50
    W 9:00 AM-12:00 PM
    Harper Center
    3A - Seminar Room
    In-Person Only